Privacy and confidentiality of medical information

Why do I need to show my identity card?

Upon registration, we use your electronic ID to uniquely and indubitably identify you as a donor. This is of fundamental importance in order to follow your donation to the recipient at any time. We read following information through the chip: the social security number, the last name, the first name, the date of birth, the gender, the address and the photograph. We are authorized by the Sector Committee within the Privacy Commission to use the identification number of the National Register.

What happens to my personal data?

We only use your personal data to manage our administrative and medical records, and for anonymous information about our blood transfusion activities. According to the legislation on the protection of privacy you have the right to access and change your personal data upon written request.

What does ‘informed consent’ mean?

This means that you give knowingly consent for the donation of your blood, plasma or platelets. Knowingly implies that you read the information material, had the opportunity to ask questions and received satisfactory answers. It also means that during the medical questionnaire and during the medical examination you provided correct and complete information to the best of your knowledge.

In addition, permission is requested for the use of remaining samples for scientific and epidemiological research. If you do not want this, you can opt-out on that on the medical questionnaire.

Finally, you indicate that you have been informed it is not recommended to carry out hazardous occupations or to practice major physical or sporting activities involving risks for myself or others up to 12 hours after the donation of blood. If you have questions relating to your donation, you can always discuss these with the doctor in charge of the donation.